Monday, September 29, 2014

The Story of Ellie - A Tale of Gratitude

Now that little Ellie is back where she belongs, healthily drinking, burping, sleeping and pooping her days away, I finally have some time to write a post for her.


If there's anything my nearly-3 years of parenthood taught me, it's that raising children is NOT just about the parents, far from it. In Noah's case, we thought we could get by with just the 2 of us and the help of my mum after delivery, but that didn't turn out too well, so this time, we really activated almost everyone we knew, near and far, to ensure a more comfortable path especially for my wife. Even then, the unpredictable nature of a newborn's health presented us with challenges we could not previously anticipate.

My poor baby, looked at her pocked hands, both of them were the same.

Less than 15 hours after Ellie's birth, she was diagnosed with Transient Tachypnea. From what I understand, it's a problem caused by fluid in Ellie's lungs, which affected her ability to breathe normally by herself without aid, especially during latching. It's not uncommon in newborns, especially those delivered via C-section before 40 weeks, nor is the condition serious, but it pained us immensely to see her all tubed up for a week, through the nose (oxygen), mouth (milk), hands and feet (IV and blood withdrawal). She also had to spend a few hours in the light box to get rid of her mild bout of jaundice.

This condition posed unexpected challenges for us. Li Li had to spend full days in the hospital when she should have been staying in the comforts of home during her confinement after discharge. I had to forgo many days of work when I already took many days of leave after  Ellie's delivery, and Noah had to spend virtually a full week in the hospital with us.

Now that this chapter is closed, I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who made this more bearable than it really should be:

- My family in Sarawak, who miraculously managed to make a huge stash of brand new baby clothes (from Australia no less) and mee sua appear in my house, and also to keep some pretty serious news from my knowledge so that I could completely concentrate on what's happening here.

Thank you Dad, especially, sorry that I neglected you because I was busy becoming a Dad myself. I thank you for your strength and understanding. Rest more and smoke less, you will see us soon.

- My in-laws, who took turns to visit Bangkok right before Li Li's delivery to carry luggages full of goodies for us.

Especially my mother-in-law, who was here during crunchtime. Sorry that Noah did not give you an easy time, but we thank you nonetheless for being here when we needed you and ensured we had nothing to worry about at home. 

外婆 and Ellie!
- Our friends, especially Grace, who recommended a good confinement lady to us, Wendy, who took the trouble to do some last minute shopping in Singapore to allow Li Li to drink the most nutritious soups in the world at home, Junhui, who bought a stunning pair of sandals for Ellie even though he did not manage to see her in the end during his trip to Bangkok, and Frances, who recommended the hospital and OPD to us.

- My CG in Singapore. We have not been around for more than 4 years, but I know some of you prayed for us, and every single prayer counted.

- The team at the hospital (doctors and nurses included), who worked tirelessly to ensure both Li Li and Ellie recovered well. I can see your heart and love when you are working, so keep it up. I just hope you are paid as handsomely as the hospital you are working for!

Maybe the best nursery in Thailand!

- Noah, my first-born. Formerly the youngest in the family but now officially an elder brother. Thank you for behaving like an angel throughout the entire week in hospital. 

Noah slept with me on the sofa in Li Li's ward.
I did not expect you to understand the importance of your sister's arrival, but you did, and you did not make a single complaint, even if we had to spend time with her at your expense.

Yes, you are behaving out of character sometimes these days, but I am sure you will get used to the many changes at home soon and return to a settled routine like before.

Noah and Ellie
The love in your eyes when you hold Ellie is unmistakable. Daddy and Mummy are so thankful to have you with us.

- And finally, my wife, Li Li.

Sorry that I can never give you the ideal amount of assistance required, and thank you for being such a brave and strong Mummy, to battle through another difficult birth process to deliver our precious daughter. We are four now, and our family will be stronger because of it.

I would also like to thank everyone who is still reading this, for sharing my unforgettable parenting journey with me. 

Noah was named during the floods in Thailand in hope that he can be a blessing in his generation. Ellie means the light of the sun. 

With Noah and Ellie, rainy days and floods are no longer scary, and there's bound to be sunshine after the rain! 

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

What would you like to be when you grow up?

Even though the picture of Sakura (from the famous online trio, Ninjagirls) as a grass cutter seems a little too sexy to be true, her latest article had me ponder a bit.

When I was little, I was constantly being 'brainwashed' by my mum to either become a doctor or a lawyer (now doesn't that sound familiar), so much that it seemed like these 2 are the only respectable jobs in the Universe, and the only 2 that will serve as a benchmark to my success as a person and my mum's personal achievement as a parent. And as Sakura mentioned, it's not uncommon to hear parents using cleaners and grass-cutters as a warning to their children if they do not do well in school.

I have posted my fair share of complaints (and praises too) about Thailand on this blog since I came, but I will have to say that after being immersed in the Thai culture for a best part of 5 years, a lot of my perspectives have changed.

I get greeted a warm "Sawadee Krup" by the guards at my condominium, banks, malls whenever they see me.

Ladies of all ages clear plates at food courts with a smile, and toilet cleaners also look just as happy as their counterparts working in nice offices. This bodes well to the end result of their work too, most public toilets in Thailand are extremely clean, even those at petrol kiosks and small eateries.

More than half of my own staff held odd jobs before they joined me, even some of my more senior staff.

I see locals making a good living in ways that would likely be discouraged by most parents in Singapore/Malaysia. Some spend years as waitresses at the same little restaurant, some repair air-conditioners so well that the ended up forming a team of technicians which can serve as many as 6 households at one go, some lose their jobs and find a new lease of life selling grilled pork along the streets. One thing that stands out, is that even if life is tough, they will try to enjoy their work when they are at it.

I have to admit though, in spite of all this, I will not be the proudest parent if Noah ends up spending his life cutting grass and pruning trees (even though I sell brush-cutters and chainsaw parts myself), but I believe that there is beauty in every job, and to excel, you have to try your best and have fun while you are at it.

At the end of the day, 行行出状元, we must give due respect to every profession that adds value to the society.

No job is more important than another, and as long as my children are happy and making a decent living out of whatever they are doing, who am I to complain?

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